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and more sophisticated and can engage and project transnational threats against the united states, one of the dangers that we now face are self-radicalized individuals who are already here in the united states. in some cases may not be part of any kind of network. but because of whatever warped, twisted ideas they may have may decide to carry out an attack. and those are in some ways more difficult to prevent. so what i have done for months now is to indicate to our entire counterterrorism team what more can we do on that threat that is looming on the horizon. are there more things we can do, whether it's engaging with communities where there is a potential for
in the united states. alabama is a border state. we happen to border water, we border the gulf of mexico. particularly in southern alabama, we're a pipeline for narcotics coming into the united states, predocument mittly out f the united states. there are major drug trafficking arteries coming into the united states. the immigration has become a great concern because some illegal immigrants, either use the drug trade or the drug trade uses them to get them into the united states. we found a direct correlation with that. initially when alabama passed this immigration law the law was very tough. it was going to place a lot of requirements on law enforcement and a lot of things we were going to have to procedurely in order to enforce this law. ironically, most law enforcement officers disagreed with the passage of this law. the reason is, we recognize that citizenship goes to the united states of america, not necessarily to the united states of alabama. >> christians feel that we have a responsibility to help those in need. we certainly demonstrated the needs to the needy and alabama is a s
of the united states house of representatives. and on this day, on this tragic day as we've watched the events unfold in boston, and each of us, our hearts go out and our prayers go out to the victims, the victims' families and all of those who are doing so much to put back together the great city of boston while our hearts bleed for the whole country, and i am -- i am -- i think optimistic that the president, at least his office, has declared this to be an act of terror. it clearly is. we will bring the perpetrators to justice and many of us fear this is another episode in a long series of episodes of terrorist attacks against americans and in the united states. and it troubles us more here than any place else than it might happen when americans are attacked any place in the world. mr. speaker, i add to this point, we are a resilient people, we are a proud, self-confident, tenacious people. and if anyone attacks americans, it has the opposite effect. it strengthens our resolve and galvanizes us to action. even though as years go by and we look back on some of these attacks on americans our vi
into the drug cartels and the drug industry in the united states, alabama is a border state. we just happen to border wart. we border the gulf of mexico. but particularly in southern alabama, we are a pipeline for narcotics coming into the . ited states, interstate 65 has been identified as major drug trafficking arteries coming into the united states. the immigration has become a great concern, because some illegal immigrants either use the drug trade or the drug trade uses them to get them in the united states, and we found a direct correlation with that. initially when alabama passed its immigration law, the immigration law was very tough. it was going to place a lot of requirements on law enforcement and a lot of things that we were going to have to do procedurally in order to enforce this law. ironically, most law enforcement officers disagreed with the legislature in the passage of this law. and the reason is we recognized that citizenship goes to the united states of america, not necessarily to the state of alabama. >> so christians feel we have a responsibility, and we certainly hav
. the north is threatening to launch a nuclear strike against the united states. >>> bank of japan policymakers decide to pump more money into the system. they're trying to pull the country out of deflation. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." north korean military commanders seem to be raising the stakes. south korea's defense minister says they appear to have put a medium range ballistic missile into position. it's their latest threat in response to ongoing u.s./south korean military drills. defense minister kim kwan-jin spoke at parliamentary committee meeting. >> translator: it's not a long-range missile but it has considerable range. it could be for test firing or for drills. >> a recent u.s. intelligence image shows what looks like a ballistic missile being moved by train to east coast of north korea. the location of a launch site. kim's description matches that of a midrange missile known as musdun. the north koreans unveiled it in 2010 during a military parade. its estimated range of 3,000 to 5,000 kilometers puts it in striking distance of japan and a u.s. base on the pac
, says his nephews never figured out how to adapt to life in the united states. >> i say what i think is behind it -- big losers, not being able to settle themselves and hating everyone. >> is a local could not say what might have motivated the two brothers to become the alleged boston marathon bombers. the 19-year-old says he studied at a prestigious cambridge school in massachusetts after receiving a scholarship. he described his dues as islamic and said the main things in life are career and monday. -- and money. we know the brothers are ethnic chechens but beyond that, the picture is not certain. when the boys were young, their family lived in the central asian nation of cure distend but may have moved to the russian republic thedagostan to escape persecution of chechens. around 2001, the family moved to the united states but the parents later returned to dagostan and let the brothers allowed in the united states. earlier, >> i am outside school number one. it is well -- this is where the whole family after they moved out of cure to stand -- kyrgystan were educated. i have been go
>> now, rashid khalidi argues the united states is far from being an impartial broker in negotiations between the israelis and palestinians. this program is just under 90 minutes. >> you all heard that crack by winston churchill that governments usually do the right thing after trying everything else. i have much less faith in that than i did when i first heard it, having work for many years on the issue of middle east peace, and especially israeli israeli-palestinian peace. but in any case we're delighted to join with our other cosponsors, the institute of palestine studies, the georgetown school of contemporary arab studies, and the middle east policy council, and joyce, who edits the excellent middle east quarterly, is here with us today. thanks to all of you for supporting this, and also for coming, and to hear a commentary by rashid about his new book, which is a superb and disheartening analysis, heavily documented, called, "borners o deceit." a stunning analysis of this terrible conflict over the last 35 years. and how the united states has been a party not just
people who are pressing the button in the midwest or the far west and the united states and across the road entire families and communities and women and children, people going to a funeral and a wedding party have been blown up and then here we see collateral damage there are no civilians being killed. we need to collect these different worlds and see ultimately is this what we the united states of america stand for, is this what we are exporting to the world? >> how do we connect the dots? >> test began and it has to be multi dimensional. it has to be more than just about security and the legality. it's the crucial element in any society but the united states also stamps for morality and it takes the vision of the founding fathers. a certain kind of society is civilization, civility itself. the only because the title civility in it so these are crucial features of the american vision and i believe that its most profound they are challenged and i think that will come. >> does the u.s. in your view, professor, have legitimate concerns? >> it has every right to be concerned. it has
that the relationships between the united states and native americans is a great priority for the united states. it's a great job. it's a great department because it covers everything from sea to shining sea and out into the 1.7 billion acres of the shelf which we control at interior. >> some have called this the department of everything else. >> some v. and if you think back to the history of the department, it's one of the older departments in the united states and it was created to handle all matters related to the interior of the united states which and over time some function versus been moved to other departments and other functions added to this department. but it is a department with a very broad mission. so the way i'd like to think about it is that we are the custodian of america's natural resources and that's all the energy. our national parks and also our history. because in the statute of liberty to the historic monuments that we oversee around the country, that is all part of our mission at the department. >> every cabinet secretary has to make decisions and get pressure on different
behind on that from the mayor said that 20 women in the united states senate. we've got a long, long ways to go. as you look at the upcoming leaders and a lot of the states and corporations, there are good women and fairly senior roles that we need to encourage and put pressure on wherever we are, to give those women a chance to take the top job. it really does matter. we were looking at this on emily's list in the next few years and has one top job but a woman has never had in this country, the one of president of the united states in case you didn't get that. at least, how do we start talking about how important it is to have women's executive leadership in the united states? that's when throw these conversations in the corporate world have you got to talk about law firms and partnerships, but also mayor ships across the country. we have great women running in new york city and chris quinn and allied and to women about to break ceilings because those cities have never elected women mayors. we've got to explain why this matters. and it does matter. they've got a whole bunch of governorsh
states and the caribbean. we are largely an advocacy office here in the united states. we work very closely with colleagues from the government of all branches. we do a lot of outreach. my role here is to be responding to inquiries. we work closely with the u.s. congress. there are a lot of staffers on the capitol hill interested in the work we do overseas. my role is to share information about what we do on a daily basis. i get questions about -- i heard 20 families move from this camp to that camp in south i heardovernight -- milies move from this camp to that camp in south sudan overnight. i've been with unhcr for almost eight years. i have been fortunate enough to travel. unhcr is an emergency organization. ucs mostly in the headlines -- ucs mostly in the headlines. serious is mostly gathering the -- you see us mostly in the headlines. syria is mostlying grabbing headlines now. those are all operations we work on with as much heart about the ones -- as the ones you care about. for almostfghanistan six months where i did donor relations. in refugee camps on the border of kenya an
never kept. the letter also promised, and i quote, that the united states will act as an honest broker. similarly, during negotiations in 2008, 17 years later, u.s. secretary of state, dr. condoleezza rice told the palestinian negotiation wanted to meet with them privately, and i quote from the palestine documents leak by the palestinian delegation saying, i want to meet with you privately, quote, so i can tell you what i think of your positions without hurting my role as the honest broker. the letter of assurances sent by secretary baker to the palestinians in 1991, and secretary rice's comments in 2008 reiterate a central myth about the palestinian-israeli conflict. this is that the united states serves as animal honest broker between the two sies. in this book, brokers of deceit, i argue that over many decades, the united states is, in fact, acted in a thoroughly one-sided fashion regarding the palestinian solution. in sons convince, csh -- consequence, it's not just resided over a process, but exacerbated and prolonged a conflict which according to another many myth is one between
" professor, when did a policy discussion about european jews begin in the united states? one could argue it begins as early as the woodrow wilson administration because britain issued the balfour declaration in 1917 that said his majesty's government will do whatever it can to provide a homeland for jews in palestine as long as it did not violate there right to of those who were already there and woodrow wilson backed the bell for a declaration. that was important but then the ascendancy to the presidency almost exactly coincides with adolf hitler's gaining control in germany and these two men, the democrat and the dictator linked first in conflict then to war and rice to the beginning of the roosevelt administration discussions over the persecution of jews in germany. >> two was leading those discussions? >> probably the leading% was an informal adviser who roosevelt had known much earlier when he was assistant secretary of the navy and they reestablished the friendship when roosevelt ran for governor in 1928 against a jewish opponent and frankfurter was an important to initiate those d
this great state of texas and continue to bless these united states of america. [applause] [applause] >> tomorrow on the c-span networks, to events marker and the 20th anniversary of the holocaust resume in washington. former president bill clinton and nobel prize winner wieselfe fell -- elie will deliver remarks. then a series of panels will discuss the holocaust and genocide prevention with live coverage beginning at noon eastern on c-span two. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> if you are trying to generate on the government and they are looking for ways to generate new revenue, silicon valley has the answers. if you're trying to explore better innovation within your , silicon valley has the answers. from an entrepreneur standpoint, how was entrepreneurship different in silicon valley and other places? so much of it is often based on failure and learning from one's experiences. it is also recognizing that you can be part of the process of adopting other people ideas or you may have the idea idea for
to get pakistani sanctuaries back into afghanistan, and the united states responded in dribs and drabs over the years. we tend to say that this is the longest war we've ever fought. if you look at the major wars, it's also the least costly. in terms, certainly, in terms of military manpower, the level of casualties in afghanistan is not only smaller than iraq, but it's much smaller than vietnam or korea or world war i or world war ii. and as a practical matter, the serious fighting has only gone on for the last four or five years. we did another study at rand which looked at what are the prospects for winning a counterinsurgency, and there are a number of elements that have to be in place to give you a reasonable prospect of winning a counterinsurgency campaign. once you have all of those elements in place, which are not just resource elements, they're also policy elements, dock -- dock tribal elements, it usually takes seven years for them to actually turn the tide and begin to definitively defeat the enemy. well, i don't think anybody would argue we had those elements in place anytim
in the world. in other words, if you have permanent members include the united states, groups from china , it includes russia, but russia is really neither economic nor military superpower , except in regards to its nuclear arsenal. and then we have france and britain. here we have to very much medium-powers, not economic heavyweights and yet still exert a great deal of force in world affairs, a great deal of influence in world affairs. a large part of that is actually a leveraged buyout the security council itself. we have no nba, no brazil, no -- no party from outside of this kind of frozen group. and this is, i think, an enormous problem for the security council and one that there is probably no structural way to overcome. and the reason why is pretty simple. if you say to any of the current members, why don't you step on down. you guys really ought to combine in a single european unity in seat. then there's a lot of hemming and hawing. in the meantime germany pops up and says, heck, we are actually one of the world's great economic superpowers. we have no military this be given canno
directly or the caribbean or the united states who lived in russia prior to 1917. the famous trips of the representatives of the harlem renaissance of people like langston hughes that was in the soviet period. i was intrigued like to find dead curious new fact i began by a google. nothing came up so i used to russia and the search engine and what came up was the same sentence that started me off but i was intrigued so i spent several months digging through yale university's library in they came up with very little and what i did was contradictory but then i was hooked and had a wonderful gift which was a yearlong sabbatical i decided to try to figure out who this man was so i did research in various places in the united states especially the national archive i went to russia and france and england and turkey and by proxy i had people begin to look in places as far from rotterdam if they had found any signs i would be on the first flight out and at the end of the year i had pulled together a surprising amount of information which allowed me to write the book that i to you about. thi
representative think tanks in the united states because this institution has a tremendously distinguished record of promoting shared solutions and dialogue with respect to the issues that matter the most to us in north america, not just because of the focus that we might have in our own jurisdictions with respect to social policy and economic growth, but the fact that we share priorities. canada and the united states have had a long trading relationship, and the priorities of this institute, energy and climate, energy security, global change, growth through innovation, are also the opportunities and the shared values that we have in alberta. it's wonderful to be able to think about the opportunities that we have to change the way that we talk about energy, social development, and the environment, and every opportunity that we have to come together to do that i think allows us to better understand what our shared goals are and can be. so right now, the reason we're all here, the reason i'm here in your beautiful city, is we are involved in witnessing some pretty heated about what progress on thos
the united states home, i think it's safe to say as the latino community goes, so goes america. we dig deeper into the concerns and challenges facing this growing community. we assembled a panel at chicago state university. joining us are mary rose wilcox, avid montejado from u.c. berkley. ana navarro. luis gutierrez from the illinois fourth congressional district, antonio gonzalez president of the william c. velazquez institute. hector, chairman of the latino coalition and we're glad you joined us. beyond the numbers starts right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said it's always the right time o do the right thing. i just try to live the right way by doing the right thing every day. we have a lot work o to do. wal-mart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we could tamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [applause] >> hell oh, my name is tavis smiley and i'm honored to be moderator for this conversation called latino nation beyond the numbers. let me ask you to welcome our panel for those in
too much abroad, particularly iraq and afghanistan. i simply thought the united states was trying to remake other societies arnd the world that would resist remaking our vital national interests, i just couldn't understand why it was we embarked on both of those nation building projects and secondly, here as home i thought we were underperforming, it was the mirror image, trying to do too much abroad and not as much as home, the fiscal debate, simpson-bowles went nowhere, any time you land at kennedy airport you get 101 course on our infrastructure and look at our schools, they are not doing it and didn't have immigration reform so it is this combination and back at home we simply were not dog tings to invest in our own future so we would have the re-- resources we could need in order to remain a great power throughout this century. >> rose: but this is not new argument a lot of people have made this argument, including the president, i think, in the speech he made at west point. >> the president has talk about nation building at home, he has done some of it but two things where i
overseas and in the united states toughened out where this person is but i think the experts all agree that there is someone who did train these two individuals. >> chris: somebody that was involved in the plot who is not either dead or captured? >> i think that is the concern is there could be a wider conspiracy. chris, what i find asounding is that right out of the boxes official' none mustily are saying -- anonymously are saying there is no foreign connection to the case when in fact the fbi just began the investigation into the case. just got his computer and just sent a u.s. team to interview witnesses and yet the narrative being played out by some in the the administration is there is no foreign connection just the two guys on their own. >> chris: and why would they push that narrative? >> i have no idea. i don't know why that is the case. early on there was a rush to judgment as a federal prosecutor former i reserve judgment to -- until all of the evidence comes in and in fairness to the fbi doing a good job investigating this they are looking into that very question. i think we
. we're taking your calls. states, we united want to hear from you as well. here's a tweet -- if you want to send us a tweet. hamilton,next in montana, independent. caller: how are you doing? , go ahead. caller: i am still very disturbed over the bush presidency. it has left a long lasting scar. he followed the policies of his father. oil seems to run through the veins of the bush family. ever since we lost john kennedy, it does not seem we have had a legitimate president. the presidents are there now to corral resources for the super rich. i voted for president obama and now i feel very sad about that, because he is carrying on the bush policies. they're going even farther with the drone strikes and things like that. i don't want is a much more, because there's kind of like this statement after saying something bad about the president, you get hung out pretty fast. we cannot turn back time. we have a new form of government that has taken over. it's not by the people anymore. ands for the super rich having the resources in the world for them. i want to say one more thing. a lady call
or vote on amendments. under the new procedures in the united states senate. none the less, madam president, we're in the unusual position of being asked to take a leap into the unknown. we're being asked to vote -- to proceed ttoan -- to proceed to n bill. that bill is not to be considered if the motion 10 proceed is successful. the language on background checks would change, it's been my understanding. remarkably, if the language changed, it would be replaced with language that does not now exist. and, of course, the world's greatest deliberative body should not operate in this fashion. in the judiciary committee four bills were considered separately. i think it's fair to say that there wasn't a consensus. three of them have now been combined, and they're not ready --, but they're not ready for consideration. at the time the sponsor of the background check bill said that it was not ready, that's what he told us in committee, there were numerous problems with that bill, he told us, movement of firearms from one law-abiding citizen to another would be legal or illegal based upon a
the secretary the united states department of treasury and light tent, two six. as the secretary, the president 's leading policy advisor on a broad range of domestic and international economic issues. in 2011 he founded the paulson institute, a nonpartisan center at the university of chicago, to remotely sustainable economic growth and a cleaner environment. the four he entered public service, secretary paulson held several leadership positions at goldman sachs, including that of chief executive officer. secretary paulson has long advocated the building of a stronger relationship between the united egg and china. while at goldman sachs he established the firm's china presence and encourage elaboration between the two largest economies has been a core purpose of the institute. he has written numerous articles -china relations, on the nation conservatives series asia-pacific council and research on chinese investment in the united states. was named managing editor of fortune in october 2 thousand six if this possibility include overseeing "fortune" magazine and fortune.com with a combined reader
semester, is to appreciate religious diversity. and we want to focus on the united states and look at some of the reason why we are so religiously diverse, and the reason for that is because we are going to be - continue to be become increasingly diverse, and we need to know how to appreciate other believers' beliefs and well do what we've been doing the whole semester. so by saying 'how it works' we want to see why we're diverse, why some religious organizations are successful, and why some don't make it. later we want - going to be wanting to look at what a cult is, what a sect is, so we can develop neutral ways of thinking about them, and overall hopefully in this segment we'll see that indeed we are religiously diverse, and a well educated person who wants to bring peace to the world, which we all do, has a good understanding of religion and at least can appreciate the dynamics. now, in this class we've already made the case several times that you don't necessarily need a religious institution to be spiritual; i think we've all agreed on that. however religious institutions are the ins
. this is not an excuse, them not getting support from the united states or from people who believe in democracy, it is no excuse to help people who are willing to murder targets. >> i was not -- i am just trying to provide an explanation, because it is absolutely true. what was tragic is that those people who recognized what was going on were almost entirely ignored. there was a lot that could have been done and should have been done and was not done. i do not believe that we bear responsibility, either then or now, for what happened. >> given your familiarity with the russian government, i have a question. the fbi investigating the boston bombing received information from russia. they sought additional information after their investigation. can you speak or shed some light on the culture that exists with law-enforcement and with security officials in both countries? could you comment on how it could be improved? >> my opinion is that -- this is my guess. cnn wanted me to comment about the contact between security forces, they said they are cooperating and we are not going to make any comments
and not religious based. they are ready to have a modern constitution. >> rose: when you look at the united states and what it ought to do, how does the united states play a role, if there is one, at this moment. >> it's a good question. i think all in all, i still give president obama high marks for how he's handled this because i think it's a difficult challenge. because a lot of people want him, and sometimes even i, you know you got to step in. look at what he's doing. but the morning after we stepped n look at just yesterday, there was the u.s. embassy in cairo tweeted where he did a pick down of this egyptian comedy and who is the john stuart of egypt. >> rose: to be reflected by a satirist. >> that was a backlash from america. there's such a neuralgic sensitivity. here's what we have to do loudly. stands up for substitutionallism, free and fair eleions a whahe we have to do is tell the opposition you've got to run. boycotting elections is the worst thing you can do. this is keyed up for the opposition. the muslim brothers have been in power for years the country is starving, unemployment,
why it was in the u.s. interest to seek cooperation to embody a set of ideals united states is the land of opportunity but all the sudden it is very popular so there is the underlying and consistent hatred that is quite rare and foreigners could make distinguishing judgments. >>host: why do we care what germans think of us? and was the last time we were asked what we thought of angela merkle? >> but. >>host: but why? >> united states has a lot of power and resources and when we get of cold day get pneumonia and when we decide to use our chairman in the long dash trend is the powerful that it looms very large for good reason in the mind of many people along the world but the reason why we should care not so much about whether to treat the foreigners well but how could we best achieve our goals? acting unilaterally and who cares were to use the multilateral institutions and coefficients of different of course, multipliers to venture we have hope to pursue our goals and policies are well thought out. in 2002 over the disputed of the run-up to the iraq war that president of fran
in the united states. i want a system that when they go, they say, boy, you are verified by the american government as being legally in the united states, legally eable to vote, and verified. and sell that to the employer and if the employer hires somebody that doesn't go through that verification system, i think the weight of the law should fall on them like never seen before. there should be penalties and there should be jail sentences so you don't hire people undocumented, illegally in this country ever again. that's going to cost money to set up that verification system. but let's just agree on this. we are going to set up such a verification system because that guarantees the american people that they feel we're not fooling around and we're not just -- we're going to legalize 11 million people without fixing the system. >> let me ask you about, your group, the house group, had been sort of reticent when we saw you at the "christian science monitor" breakfast a month ago, you said you wouldn't confirm the pistence of the group. >> i can't do that now. >> but you issued a joint statem
on detainee treatment act and the use of torture by the united states. it is indisputable that you can statesthe best be united engaged in the practice of torture. that is tomorrow's edition of "washington journal's we will see tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> the mexican ambassador to the united states talks about immigration. then a top of all -- the talk about that for resources. and then the debate up on afghanistan. ambassador discussed immigration, trade, and the future of u.s.-mexican relations monday at an event hosted by the new policy institute. president obama is scheduled to visit mexico in may, where he will meet with the newly- elected mexican presidents. this is one hour, 25 minutes. >> welcome, everybody. we will begin. thank you for coming. if i can ask all of your potato chip bags be discreet in the way you eat them and the up with it -- obligatory notice of tournament -- turning off the ringers on your mobile phones, but encouraging u.s. the
to welcome our viewers in the united states an around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. this is a cnn "the situation room" special report. the north korean crisis happening now. defensive missiles are up and arm. waiting for north korea's dangerous move that could happen at any time. how can kim jong-un test his missiles and the patience of the world. we're following the money. >>> americans on vacation in a crisis zone. their pleasure tour of north korea. >>> u.s. officials fear this could -- could be the week that north korea goes ahead with a provocative missile launch or something everyone worse. kim jong-un's regime warns the region is coming in the words of hot bed of war. north korea is suspending operations and a huge industrial complex near the border jointly owned with south korea. our correspondents are covering this unfolding crisis and u.s. response with tons of thousands of americans potentially at risk. let's bring in our pentagon correspondent right now, barbara starr. what's the very latest, barbara? >> well, wolf, at this hour, we can tell you that the u.s. intelligence c
, economy, and our future. >> stairmaster president, in order for the united states to the life ofbe in freedom and liberty, the growing deficit and debt should be the most important issue to consider in your presidential journey. isat the moment, our future a dilemma. in school, extracurriculars like athletics and art is part of our preparation for a better future. it is important to us. >> in the united states, the economy is a significant part of our society. buying, selling, and trading, borrowing, and using money to fuel economic growth locally and nationally cleared it leads us to stability and prosperity. >> the economy is the most important activity in any society. when you buy stuff, when you owe to school, when you buy a house, when you of the bank and deposit your money -- it is all part of economic activity. is --ever, the economy due to deficit and debt. the federal deficit is at more than $1 trillion. the national debt is that more and $16 trillion. the senior director of the bipartisan policy desk says that the debt has been acutely living so much that the economy is o
check. well all three of those concepts are going to be on the floor of the united states senate for a vote, and they're all going to lose. why? because they're not the solution to the problem we all face. >> on this vote the yeas are 54, the nays are 46. >> reporter: in the end, as vice president biden presided, the background check amendment failed to clear the 60-vote threshold needed to pass. the concealed firearm measure and the ban on assault weapons. also failed. but late in the day, senate democrats-- joined by family members of victims of gun violence-- pledged to keep up the fight. >> i want everyone to understand this is just the beginning not the end. the forces so obsessed with defeating any commonsense reforms whatsoever, they lost site of big picture. >> reporter: and president obama spoke minutes later from the white house rose garden. >> no single piece of legislation can stop ever act of violence and evil. we learned that tragically just two days ago. but if action by congress could have saved one person, one child, a few hundred, a few thousand, if it could hav
. the united states recognizes. they tried to us killick in the grill. it's not a federal penalty in 1949 and 50. as we saw in 7073, some of those cases there were a bit too close for comfort and were in some of those cases you could say only some kind of outside intervention saved the state. it may have been check weapons. americans had another point. i think for a policy standpoint and for people who hated the ally, alas, during the cold war. the continuing belief the continuing disposition. and this could be turned around. it may take awhile, but it may be takes another 65 years. does the reference. so i think that the differences for so many people it is still not complete, and that is why that is why i think you cannot possibly ever exaggerates the importance of the closest possible most visible ties with the united states. this is a country surrounded by enemies with hundreds of millions of people around the world who wish to eliminate the country. of course the iranian said to do it more quickly. others want to do it or willing to do more slowly. we do not accept the permanence of
goals the united states will be looking for to achieve in that country? there are certain security metrics and measurable levels of security we are hoping to reach? what would it take for you to be comfortable in saying we would no longer need a troop presence in afghanistan? >> the focus post-2014 is about growing capability in the afghans. some challenges the past -- start at the level. they cannot manage a budget right now. as an example, last year, won the execute a very small percentage of the budget, they actually had, it was not due to corruption, but bureaucratic inefficiency. it is very important to sustain our efforts. by the same token there are logistics issues. having logistic infrastructure in place that can assure distribution of supplies all the way down to the lower level is an area that needs to be continued to work on. as i spoke about a minute ago, a leadership development is also important. when i start to look at what we need to do pass 2014, to be clear, our efforts to provide -- our efforts will be to provide security forces. we will be able to measure that
they had thought about terrorism in the united states in that week. 10% had thought about being the victim of violent crime or hospitalization. so terrorism remains an issue on the minds of many americans. findingse some other with respect to counter- terrorism. thee about 87% of population felt that the government has been somewhat or very effective in the counter- terrorism realm, 69% feel there's been nothing that can be done to stop a terrorist attack if the individual or organization is dead set to do it. host: this tour was published last week by the new york times. it may surprise a lot of people. it basically summarizes where we have been in attacks. in the 1970's, as many as 400 terrorist related attacks. declinesee a steady over the years, and the number of deaths as a result of that. then the huge increase on september 11, 2001, but then a steady decline since then. until the boston bombings, there has been a sense of, some say, complacency. guest: the numbers are somewhat surprising. terrorist of incidents does decrease and in the last decade, the numbers continue to trend down
for a nuclear strike on the united states and elsewhere. john kerry met south korean president in the capital of seoul, south -- korea. they have strong war -- words of warning for the south korean leadership. >> the rhetoric we are hearing from north korea is unacceptable and it -- by any standard. i am here to make it clear on behalf of president obama and pieces of the united states and our bilateral security agreement that the united states will defend our allies and defend ourselves. harry, you heard from the foreign minister. tell us about the talks. >> as well as what you would expect to hear with john kerry, this is strong support for american i lack -- allies. he is also coming into a situation with an ally that has changed its position. south korea said it would not negotiate with north korea, especially on the issue of the industrial complex that has been shut down. in the last couple of hours, that position has changed. south korean officials in size on friday that they were open to talks. was a necessary first step in lowering tensions. john kerry said the united states with only
hunting. members of the united states senate and congress own those firearms. paul ryan, for example, owns one of those and goes hunting with them. >> ifill: that one was a forgone concliewrkz as were the magazine clips, but the background checks not so much. >> our concern with the universal background checks is we think the problem we see is you have to fix the nix system. the first thing you need to do is fix the nix system which is why our industry is funding an initiate toif work at the grass-roots level to work with the states falling down on the jobs and not getting the background checks-- getting the information into the background check system. the system is only as good as the information that's in it, and background checks that are incompleted and accurate don't help anybody. having more of those background checks that are incomplete also doesn't help anybody. >> ifill: as far as you're concerned even though the president-- or harry reid said, this is round one-- both of them said it-- you think for the federal level this argument is over. >> no, i don't think so at all. i met w
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
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